Howling Coyote in deep grass and flowers
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Coyote Killing Contests – Upcoming Events for Protest

Press Release
Contact: Jan Raffaele, 774-237-0797

It’s time to end coyote killing contests in Massachusetts

In 2017 Powderhorn Outfitters, a Hyannis gun shop, launched its first “annual” coyote killing contest on the Cape, to award prizes for the heaviest coyote and the largest coyote killed by men, women, and youth. The second annual killing contest just ended on 3/10/19. A similar event is annually held in Granby, MA.

The idea of killing contests for fun and for prizes brings outrage too many people. Remember Cecil the lion?

As more and more people learn about the practice of senseless killing contests across the country they find it more and more disturbing. As concerned citizens of Cape Cod we need to make our voices heard about what is going on in our own backyard.

Senator Julian Cyr and Representative Sarah Peake have been working for months with the Department of Fish and Wildlife (MassWildlife) to get a meeting scheduled here on the Cape regarding the coyotes and particularly the coyote-killing contest that has been sponsored by Powderhorn Outfitters in Hyannis and will be in attendance.

There are two important upcoming events you should plan to attend.

Thursday April 4th, 6-8 pm – Cape Cod Community College, 2240 Iyannough Road, West Barnstable, in Lecture Hall A in the Science Building (Building 6).

Massachusetts Division of Fisheries and Wildlife (MassWildlife) will hold a public listening session. Staff will make a short presentation which will be followed by a comment and ask-question period.

A map of the campus is available at: https://www.capecod.edu/web/about-us/campus-map.

June 18th, 2019 – A time and suitable location will be later determined.

MA Fisheries and Wildlife Board will hold its annual business meeting on the Cape, followed by a second listening session. Both events are an opportunity for concerned citizens to express their views to MassWildlife on the annual coyote killing contest.

For more information about wildlife killing contests and, specifically, the behavior and biology of coyotes, please go to www.projectcoyote.org.

The Massachusetts Division of Fisheries and Wildlife solely benefits consumptive users (hunters) despite the fact that our state’s fish and wildlife resources belong to all citizens. Ninety-five percent of Massachusetts residents do not hunt, and non-consumptive users (wildlife watchers) outnumber and outspend consumptive users in our state.

Thank you for caring and for taking action!

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Wildlife Workshop Agenda

Friends of Cape Wildlife Hotline Workshop Agenda
Resolving the Public’s Wildlife Problems in Minutes
A Phone-Advising and Wildlife Problem-Solving Workshop
Presenter: Laura Simon M.E.S., Yale School of Forestry and Environmental Studies
President, Connecticut Wildlife Rehabilitators Association
October 20th 2018, International Fund for Animal Welfare (IFAW) 290 Summer St Yarmouth Port MA
10:00-11:00 am: Handling the Public’s Wildlife Dilemma Calls – Part 1
Value of phone advising
Saves lives, reduces intakes, educates public about coexistence
Working with human psychology
Asking the right questions to confirm the species and situation
Making a good problem diagnosis / identifying and addressing source of problem
Getting public cooperation, receptivity to your advice
Packaging and delivering advice
Fear-based calls vs. true problem calls
Giving the right advise – after making a proper diagnosis
Keeping control of the calls; getting successful outcomes
Reuniting and wild-fostering as a priority
Rehabilitation as a last resort
Rescue advice
Capture/ transport tips
Hotline mechanics
How typical calls will work,
Role of volunteer hotline handlers
Record-keeping
Introducing the new cloud–based hotline and software
11:00-11:15 am: BREAK
11:15-12:15 pm: Handling the Public’s Wildlife Dilemma Calls – Part 2
Seasonal Calls
Typical calls this time of year – how to handle
Mystery Scenarios: Test your skills!
Handling the Larger Issue that Comes with the Animal
Ways to address and fix the root cause of harm to animals
Working with the media to achieve your goals
Special challenges
Outdoor cats, chronic trappers, nasties, avid relocaters
12:15 – 1:15 pm: LUNCH –
Bring a bag lunch or let us know if you would like pizza delivery
1:15 – 1:30 pm: Handling Conflict Calls
Nuisance wildlife control industry/ traditional practices
The Humane Wildlife Services (HWS) approach
Eviction and Exclusion approach, solve problem at source
Biologically-based, on-site release, least invasive
Humane outcomes, orphaning avoided
1:30 – 3:15 pm: Species by Species Profiles
Relevant natural history and typical problems/solutions for raccoons,
woodchucks, squirrels, bats,  opossums, skunks, birds.
3:15 – 3:30 pm: BREAK
3:30- 4:00 pm: discussion and wrap-up

For more information call (508) 375-3700 and listen for the prompt or email friends@friendsofcapewildlife.org

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Wildlife Hotline Workshop

As part of our mission we are developing a 24/7 wildlife hotline that will provide a responsive system of life-saving information to callers. This is a cloud based hotline that can be answered from anywhere. We strongly believe that wildlife calls answered by a live operator will serve wildlife in need when other wildlife centers are unavailable. 

According to Dr. Mark Pokras, Director of the Tufts Wildlife Clinic, MA(Ret.), in his experience 80% of all human/wildlife interactions could be resolved by talking to the caller.

In this free workshop, learn how to advise callers about non-lethal solutions when addressing conflicts between people and wildlife and to encourage humane coexistence with our wild neighbors.

The workshop is designed to educate volunteers who would like to become a member of our wildlife hotline team of operators, rescuers and transporters. We also welcome any Cape Cod ACO, DNR officer or municipal official who deals with wildlife and would like to attend. The course offers 5 educational credits for ACOs.

Advance registration is required and you can click here to register. For more information call (508) 375-3700 and listen for the prompt or email friends@friendsofcapewildlife.org

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Time to nurture nature’s newbies

By Katy Ward
Posted May 10, 2018 at 7:00 AM – courtesy of the Provincetown Banner

PROVINCETOWN — It’s baby-boom time for wildlife on the Cape and people need to understand how to coexist with compassion.

That’s why Friends of Cape Wildlife will present “Why Wildlife Matters,” with Kathy Zagzebski, of the National Marine Life Center in Bourne, and Stephanie Ellis, of Wild Care in Eastham, on Wednesday, May 23 at Napi’s Restaurant in Provincetown.

“It is our responsibility to rectify our human impact,” said Ellis, executive director of Wild Care, which cares for sick and injured small wildlife. “There’s not really any such thing as nature taking its course. It’s trying to take its course, but we are in the way.”
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Why Wildlife Matters

Friends of Cape Wildlife & Napi’s Restaurant Present

WHY WILDLIFE MATTERS

With Kathy Zagzebski & Stephanie Ellis

Wednesday May 23rd at 7pm
7 Freeman St.
Provincetown
FREE
(Donations gratefully accepted)

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Science Matters! Learn About The Eastern Coyote

When: Saturday, Feb. 10, 2018
Time: 12:00 to 1:30 PM
Where: Hyannis Library, 401 Main Street
Eastern Coyote/Coywolf Ecology: Myths vs. Facts
With Dr. Jon Way 

Are you on the fence about coyotes? Don’t know who to believe? Do coyotes pose a threat to humans? What about dogs and cats? Where did coyotes come from, are they invasive? What do they eat? Where do they live? You may find it hard to discriminate facts from fiction. You may be surprised to learn that people are exponentially more likely to be attacked by a dog than a coyote, that coyotes are monogamous, and they often mate for life. Wildlife laws do little to protect them and scientists are deeply concerned about gratuitous, indiscriminate killing of carnivores and consider “carnivore cleansing” whether in contests or trophy hunting as ecologically destructive practices.
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