A Baby Possum Story

This Sweet Girl is a Fighter

by Caryn Ritchie

This sweet girl arrived as an orphan baby opossum. She was given to a home wildlife rehabilitator who specializes in animal husbandry of opossums. It was discovered that this baby had a severe eye injury and no sight in that eye. Other than that injury, she was in good health.

The decision was made for her to undergo surgery to remove her eye. I was there for her surgery, and it was very successful. She spent some postoperative time at the clinic to recover before returning to complete her rehabilitation.

Unfortunately she developed an infection and numerous abscesses. The outlook was looking grim, but she had other ideas.

She fought the infection, healed beautifully and returned to her rehabilitation. There she was taught how to be a wild opossum and was prepared for release as a wild animal.

Don’t you love a happy ending?

Volunteer Training February 4 2017

Thirty-two volunteers attended a refresher seminar at the Cape Wildlife Center given by Dr. Lynn Miller. This was held for existing CWC volunteers to have an opportunity to learn about new techniques in wildlife care and rehabilitation, and to practice some of their old skills. There was a lecture component on physical assessment, triage skills, including fluids and medication administration, and splinting of broken bones. Dr. Miller reviewed proper techniques to avoid spreading disease to other patients and to our selves. She also discussed general husbandry. This was followed by a hands -on session where these skills were practiced on cadaver animals.

The level of commitment and skill of these volunteers was impressive. We thank them for wanting to learn as much as possible and for giving up an entire Saturday of their own time to do so. Thank you also to Dr. Miller for sharing her time and her vast store of knowledge.

Why is Wildlife Rehabilitation so Important for Cape Cod

by Diane Boretos, P.W.S. Call of the Wild Environmental Services

The wildlife on Cape Cod enhances the quality of our lives on a daily basis. Growing up in Falmouth, I often often saw deer, bobwhite quail, pheasant and foxes pass by our yard. It was always a thrill to see them.

In spite of the fact that we have evolved with these other beings over the millennia, many humans do not recognize and embrace their intrinsic connection to all the species who comprise our world.

As primates still residing in trees, we learned about predators, prey, mobility, food sources, etc. By watching what other species were doing in the savannas and in the forests, we learned to survive. And there are lessons we can continue to learn now. Read more

Peking Duck Story

An Unusual “not quite wildlife” Cape Wildlife Center Story

by Elizabeth Brooke with Lynn Miller

One night there was call from the Barnstable Animal Control Officer – “Could you admit a duck please?” So Lynn Miller, the Director of Wildlife Rehabilitation, popped back to the center. Turns out it was a Peking duck from Hyannis; obviously a well-known girl, and cared about. Lynn did a quick exam as the wing was quite odd and realized it was a very old injury. She suspected a dislocation at the wrist, so nothing to be done. Lynn gave her food and water and wished her good night. As she drove out, there was a Police vehicle in the drive only there to enquire how the duck was. Read more